Restaurants & Roadhouses

The Wishbone Inn

The Wishbone Inn wanted passersby to know that it was "not a roadhouse--just a house by the side of the road." Located at 7330 Bothell Way, the inn served chicken dinners in the 1940s. The Schnitzelbank, a German restaurant, was a later, longtime occupant of the site. Photo courtesy of…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Bob’s Place Reopens

A smiling staff is ready in March 1945 as Bob's Place reopens in its new building at 76th Avenue NE and Bothell Way. Charles and Hazel Sarvis operated the popular eatery. Photo courtesy of the Sarvis family.
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Bob’s Place

A new building in 1945 is ready for customers of the popular Bothell Way roadhouse called Bob's Place. Originally opened in the 1920s by Swiss chef Bob Steiger in a smaller building, Bob's Place was sold to Charlie and Hazel Gaugle in 1936. The Charles Sarvis family operated the restaurant…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Kenmore Inn

The Kenmore Inn staff stands ready to offer oysters and Sunday dining in March 1935. The cafe opened in the early 1930s at 63rd Avenue NE and Bothell Way, giving way to the Chowder Bowl in 1941. The site later became the home of a travel agency. Photo courtesy of…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Hot Cake King

Henry Jang, the Hot Cake King, takes a smoke break in the 1950s outside his popular restaurant at 73rd Avenue NE and Bothell Way. Jang advertised dollar-sized pancakes, "all you can eat." Photo courtesy of Gary Jang.
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Henry’s Hamburgers

Henry Lemm built three eateries as he moved westward along Bothell Way in the 1920s and '30s. Starting with a hot dog stand at the Wayne Curve, he operated a tavern and cafe at 73rd Avenue NE before settling in 1931 at 6215 Bothell Way with this building that offered…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Victory Drive Inn

Leslie and Mary Ogle, known affectionately as Mom and Pop, operated the Victory Drive Inn on Bothell Way and offered a deluxe hamburger and fries for sixty cents in 1949. Photo courtesy of Gloria Eneix Laurine.
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Ingram’s Drive Inn

Hungry customers received curb service at Kenmore's first drive-in restaurant, called Ingram's Drive Inn and later Victory Inn as a tribute to the World War II effort. Les and Mary Ogle took over the restaurant in 1942 on Bothell Way just west of 68th NE. Photo courtesy of Gloria Eneix…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

The Eagle Inn

The Eagle Inn at 76th Avenue NE and Bothell Way (in this 1957 photo) began life as Mammy's Shack in the early 1930s and was a popular roadhouse for four decades. In later years, it was called the Porterhouse Eagle Inn and then simply the Porterhouse Inn. Photo courtesy of…
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019
Restaurants & Roadhouses

Old Southern Home

A popular stop for Sunday drivers in the 1930s along Kenmore's Restaurant Row was My Old Southern Home, operated by Pearl Iverson. She advertised chicken on toast for fifty cents at the restaurant at 78th Avenue NE and Bothell Way. Photo courtesy of Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Branch.
SuzanneG
February 7, 2019